• History Timeline

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    Each month, the Historic Timeline, written by Jerry Neath and Mary Norwell, examines important events that happened 10, 25, 50, and 100 years ago.

    Fifty years ago, heavy storms hit the Oregon area, with a tornado actually being reported in Sun Prairie. Do you know whose truck this is? Click 'Read More' to read about this, and other moments in history.
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  • History Timeline

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    Each month, the Historic Timeline, written by Jerry Neath and Mary Norwell, examines important events that happened 10, 25, 50, and 100 years ago.

    Fifty years ago, these children were enjoying the hot temperatures at the Oregon Pool. Click 'Read More' to learn about other moments in history.
    read more
    slider image
  • History Timeline

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    Each month, the Historic Timeline, written by Jerry Neath and Mary Norwell, examines important events that happened 10, 25, 50, and 100 years ago.

    One hundred years ago, these 2500 officers and men passed through Oregon. Do you know where they came FROM and where they were going TO? Click 'Read More' to Find out.
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Early Settlers displayLEAD TRAIL

Early trails, often based on Indian trails, became stagecoach and mail routes. As the lead industry in southwestern Wisconsin expanded in the 1830’s following the Blackhawk War, trails were developed over the highland ridges eastward across to Milwaukee and Racine. Two of these Lead Trails, which passed through our area, influenced the development of our early settlements. The lead ore was transported by canvas covered wagons pulled by teams of 4 to 8 oxen.

EARLY SETTLERS (1840’s)

The first settlement in the area can be attributed to Bartley Runey who built a log cabin in 1841 just south of the present day Village of Oregon at the junction of Union Road and Old Stage Road, located along the “Old Lead Trail.” The tavern that he established there became a favorite stopping place for teamsters hauling lead from Mineral Point to Milwaukee. It was also located along the mail route from Janesville to Madison.

Robert Thomson, the first settler in what was to become the Village of Oregon, built a log cabin in 1842 along the banks of what is now Thompson’s Creek, near Janesville and S. Perry Parkway. A large Victorian farmhouse, built on the property in 1889 by Robert’s nephew, George Thomson, has since been moved to a site outside the village.

C.P. Mosely was one of the first settlers in the Village of Oregon. He built a part log, part frame house and tavern in 1843 near the site of the present day water tower on Janesville Street. It served as a place for religious and business meetings for the early settlers and became the nucleus of the central village area. It was later purchased by I.M. Bennett and operated as a country general store and tavern. The initial meetings organizing the Presbyterian Church were held there.

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FOURTH CELEBRATION WAS A SPLENDID SUCCESS(The Oregon Observer, Vol. XXXVII., 11 July 1918, No. 46, pg. 1)

The Fourth of July celebration and auction sale for the benefit of the Red Cross was an unqualified success in every particular. Nearly $3000 were the gross receipts, and after all expenses are paid there will be a net profit of about $2660 for the Red Cross. Of this amount the Rutland, Dunn and Fitchburg branches will each receive about $400 as their share of the proceeds. The receipts exceeded all expectations and those in charge of the affair have every reason to be grateful to all who assisted in making the day a success.

The morning program was carried out to the letter as advertised. The introductory remarks by W. L. Ames, as president of the day, were short but very fitting to the occasion. Geo. A. Boissard, chairman of the Dane County Liberty Loan Committee, presented the handsome silk banner which was won by Oregon in the recent Liberty Loan Drive. The winning of this banner is all the more remarkable from the fact that no special effort was made to secure it. On behalf of Oregon the banner was accepted by J. S. Cusick in a short but appropriate address. The principal address of the day was delivered by Judge Walter C. Owen, a member of the Supreme Court. Mr. Owen is a forceful speaker and his excellent address was chuck full of patriotism and loyalty. It was pronounced one of the best ever heard here. The two selections by the Male Quartet were greatly enjoyed as was also the music by the band.

The ladies in charge of the dinner took care of the crowd at the noon hour without the least confusion and every one was provided for in a short space of time.

Immediately after dinner the auction sale took place and the list included livestock, poultry, machinery, tools, wearing apparel, eatables, fancy work, in fact articles of every description. L. A. Ross, the noted Belleville auctioneer, presided at the block and the large humber of articles he disposed of in a space of three hours was remarkable, and everything sold brought fairly good prices.

The ball game in the park between the single and married men was won by the former by a score of 10 to 3. The concluding feature of the event was the dance in the opera house, which was largely attended and much enjoyed by those present.

The committee of the local Red Cross who promoted the celebration desire here to thank their subcommittees, solicitors, those who donated articles, those who took part in the program, the Oregon band, auctioneer, L. A. Ross, and all others who assisted in any measure to make the day such a splendid success.

 

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weatherClimatological Data for Sept. 12th, 1915

Data from the Department of Agriculture, Weather Bureau.  Madison recorded 5.2 inches in 12 hours on September 12-13, which exceeded all previous daily records of rainfall for that station.

Cyclone 1878

This cyclone originated and started at Mineral Point, in Iowa County, moving and plowing its way eastward and northeastward, crossing into Dane County and the town of Perry and on into the town of Primrose, where just south of Mt. Vernon it began to involve in its ravages Oregon friends and acquaintances, and especially in the Chandler and Ozburn families.

Cyclone 1914

The most destructive cyclone or hurricane that ever visited this community passed over Oregon about 10 o’clock Monday morning leaving ruin and destruction in its path. It covered a large area and it is estimated that the damage ran into hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Email re: 1914 Cyclone

“A severe squall, accompanied by hail occurred at 9:32 a.m. Much damage was done to tobacco sheds, and farm buildings, and four persons were killed. The damage done is estimated at about $500,000…”

Oregon’s Geological/Glacial Past

When the climate warmed about 15,000 years ago, the glaciers started to retreat, leaving distinctive landforms in part of Dane County.

Record Rainfall on Sept. 12, 1915

Diary record September 12, 1915: Cloudy to threatening A.M. and up to 3:30 P.M., when a heavy thunder shower struck us from the northwest, and by 9 P.M., 12 such showers followed one another from the same quarter, each deluging us with an inch of rainfall, hence 12 inches of rainfall in 12 showers in 6 hours.

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